The Ban on Fluorescent Lighting

multiple linear fixtures in a commercial building with fluorescent bulbs

Our team at Big Shine is dedicated to providing high-quality, energy-efficient lighting solutions. Recent developments on the federal and state levels in the United States have us excited for a brighter future – one where fluorescent bulbs are a thing of the past.

Federal Level

In April 2022, the U.S. Department of Energy implemented new standards for general service lamps to meet a minimum efficacy of 45 lumens per watt. This effectively removed many incandescent and halogen bulbs from the market as they could not meet this standard.

More recently, the Biden Administration finalized rules first proposed two years ago that will phase out compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in the coming years. This move marks a significant step towards a more sustainable future, as CFLs will no longer meet the minimum efficacy standards of 120 lumens per watt.

State Level

Several states had already taken matters into their own hands, implementing their own bans on fluorescent bulbs. Vermont led the charge, with a ban on CFLs taking effect in February 2023 and four-foot linear fluorescent lamps in January 2024. California followed suit on January 1, 2024, and other states like Colorado, Hawaii, and Massachusetts are close behind.

Here’s a complete list:

  1. California: Banned the sale of screw-based or bayonet-based CFL by 204 and pin-based CFLs and linear fluorescent lamps by 2025.
  2. Colorado: Banned the sale of fluorescent lamps (CFL and otherwise) by 2025.
  3. Hawaii: Eliminated the sale of compact fluorescent lamps and linear fluorescent lamps by 2025.
  4. Maine: Eliminated the sale of fluorescent lamps starting January 1, 2026.
  5. Maryland: Banned linear fluorescents with a CRI greater than or equal to 87 starting October 1, 2024.
  6. Massachusetts: Banned linear fluorescents with a CRI greater than or equal to 87.
  7. Nevada: Banned the sale of high CRI linear fluorescent lamps starting July 1, 2023.
  8. New Jersey: Banned high CRI (greater or equal to 87) linear fluorescent lamps starting January 18, 2023.
  9. Oregon: Banned the sale or distribution of compact fluorescent lamps with a screw-based or bayonet-base type starting January 1, 2024, and pin-based type compact fluorescent lamps and linear fluorescent lamps by January 1, 2025.
  10. Rhode Island: Eliminated the sales of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) starting January 1, 2024, and the sale of pin-based and linear fluorescent lamps by January 1, 2025.
  11. Vermont: Banned the sale of screw-base compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) starting February 17, 2023, and four-foot linear fluorescent lamps by January 1, 2024.
  12. Washington: Banned high-CRI linear fluorescent lamps (CRI of 87 or greater) as of 2023.
  13. Washington, DC: Banned high CRI (>=87) linear fluorescent lamps as of March 2022.

These state-level initiatives demonstrate a growing commitment to reducing energy consumption and promoting eco-friendly lighting options.

What This Means for Facilities

As a customer, you can trust that Big Shine Worldwide is ahead of the curve. Our LED products have always met the highest efficiency standards. And we’re proud to offer a range of sustainable lighting solutions. As the phase-out of fluorescent bulbs continues, we’re here to support you in making the switch to LED. Not only will you be reducing your environmental impact, but you’ll also enjoy the cost savings and improved lighting quality that comes with LED technology.

Join us in embracing a brighter, more sustainable future. Make the switch to Big Shine LED today!

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